What Does “Following” Mean?

Section in 109(g)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code bars a debtor from filing a new case for 180 days if the Debtor voluntarily dismisses a case “following” a motion for relief. Not surprisingly, courts are split on how they interpret the word “following” as used in § 109(g)(2). After all, the word “following” is not limited to one definition, or even one part of speech for that matter – it can be used a preposition, a noun, a pronoun, an adjective, or a verb. There are several ways that courts have interpreted the term in connection with § 109 . . .

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Mott & Gendron Law

Kara Gendron is co-owner of Mott & Gendron Law, located in Harrisburg, Pa. In her spare time, she loves to explore nature – especially if it involves snorkeling – and hanging out with her four kids at Hershey Park or various sporting events. She is a frequent course planner and presenter for national and local bankruptcy law seminars. Kara has been practicing bankruptcy law exclusively since 2001 and focuses her practice on representing individuals, farmers, and small business owners in bankruptcy cases.  Kara is board certified in Consumer Bankruptcy Law and a certified bankruptcy court mediator. In addition to her private bankruptcy law practice, she is a Chapter 7 Trustee and a Chapter 12 Trustee.

Kara is a Board Member of the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys (NACBA) and serves as NACBA’s Chair for the Circuit Leader Committee. Kara is on the Board of Directors for American Board of Certification (ABC) and is a long time Board member of the Middle District Bankruptcy Bar Association (MDBBA). Additionally, she is an Advisory Board Member of the American Bankruptcy Institute (ABI) Consumer Practice Extravaganza, an Advisory Board Member for the Middle District of Pennsylvania Bankruptcy Court, and an Advisory Board Member for the American Bankruptcy Law Journal Advisory Board (ABLJ), which is published by the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges (NCBJ).

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