Judicial Year in Review 2021: Part 4 Selected Cases under Parts VIII and IX of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure

Introduction

Following Part 1's review of the December 1, 2021 changes in the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Part 2 and It looks like you are not signed in or registered! This content is only available to members.

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Brown & Ahern (Nashville, TN)

Larry Ahern is a partner in Brown & Ahern and is an Adjunct Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University (teaching Secured Transactions) and St. John’s University (Bankruptcy Procedure). He is a Fellow of the American College of Bankruptcy and the American College of Mortgage Attorneys and a Director of the Association of Insolvency and Restructuring Advisors. A Rule 31 Certified Mediator in Tennessee, he also holds national certification as a Business Bankruptcy Specialist by the American Board of Certification. Larry practiced bankruptcy and commercial law after his 1972 graduation from Vanderbilt until 2013, when he limited his practice to mediation and other alternate dispute resolution, consulting engagements by legal and financial professionals on legal issues involving bankruptcy, real estate and commercial law, expert testimony, writing, teaching, and speaking. In addition to his current teaching positions, he serves on the Advisory Board of the St. John’s Law School Bankruptcy LL.M. program and, in 2002, was Visiting Professor at Cumberland School of Law (Secured Transactions and Banking). He also chaired the American Board of Certification and the Tennessee Commission on CLE & Specialization and continues serving the ABC as Director Emeritus. Larry’s other professional affiliations include the American Bankruptcy Institute (former Director) and the Mid-South Commercial Law Institute (former Director and President). He is the author or co-author of 19 books and articles on bankruptcy and commercial law, with other articles pending, and he is a frequent speaker and writer.

Related Articles

February 9, 2020
By The Honorable William Houston Brown (Retired) Unreasonable fees for proof of claim. $4,000 fee for private mortgagee’s proof of claim and objection to proposed plan was unreasonable, and creditor was denied recovery of $7,500 attorney fee for responding to debtor’s objection to proof of claim. The Court considered Fannie Mae’s guidelines for maximum fees related to proof of claim...
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August 8, 2021
by William Houston Brown, Adviser, Academy for Consumer Bankruptcy Education, Inc. The Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on August 3, 2021, on student loans, and during the Committee hearing, Senator Durbin, Chair of the Committee, stated that he would be introducing an Act to amend student loan discharge provisions in the Bankruptcy Code. That Act was subsequently introduced by...
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April 19, 2020
By Cathy Moran, Esq. (Redwood City, CA) Mortgage forbearance for homeowners, shout the headlines. No need to make a house payment. Borrowers who can’t make this month’s mortgage payment were thrown a lifeline of sorts in the coronavirus rescue package. Only it’s probably not the help they think it is. And the lifeline may be far more fragile than they...
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February 24, 2019
By Cathy Moran, Esq. (Redwood City, CA) We all get sucked in, at some time, to try and rescue a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case gone bad. Make sure that you don’t let a bad situation get worse. Get your arms around §109(g). When only a do-over will do, don’t wait around. No Payments for Months The debtor came to me...
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February 21, 2021
Lawrence R. Ahern, III, Brown & Ahern (Nashville, TN) Appendix 11 U.S.C. § 365(d)(3) and (4), Showing Changes Made by Consolidated Appropriation Act, 2021 ("CAA"), Pub. L. 116-260, 134 Stat. 1182 (eff. Dec. 27, 2020) (Sunset December 27, 2022. Changes continue to apply in cases commenced before sunset under subchapter V of Chapter 11.) 11 U.S.C. § 365(d)(3) Pre-CAA Post-CAA...
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March 15, 2020
By Professor Nancy Rapoport, University of Nevada Dear Readers: The marvelous, indefatigable Regina Logsdon just forwarded me this hypothetical: Post-confirmation, debtor/client gets upset with attorney. Let’s assume for this scenario that the attorney hasn’t done anything wrong – perhaps just a difference of opinion on a plan modification (or not). Debtor/client says ugly things to attorney – name-calling, etc. THEN...
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May 1, 2022
The Bankruptcy Code imposes many duties on attorneys. One such duty requires attorneys to disclose compensation for services in contemplation of, or in connection with a bankruptcy case.1 Debtor attorneys know to disclose their fees at the start of the case. Attorneys that forget to timely file a compensation disclosure typically receive a gentle reminder to do so. However, in...
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September 12, 2021
By Lawrence R. Ahern III, Brown & Ahern (Nashville, TN) Introduction In re Taggart In 2019, the Supreme Court in In re Taggart1 ruled that the acts alleged in that case to be in violation of a discharge injunction did not empower the bankruptcy court to find the creditor in contempt. In so holding, the Court ostensibly attempted to strike...
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June 30, 2019
By Henry E. Hildebrand, III, Chapter 13 Standing Trustee (Nashville, TN) Over the past twenty years, the judicial estoppel doctrine has had a significant impact on people who file bankruptcy. Judicial estoppel has grown to be a significant issue within the consumer bankruptcy system. The Commission was asked to address it. Judicial estoppel is a doctrine created to protect the...
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August 18, 2019
By Cathy Moran, Esq. (Redwood City, CA) My Google Alert popped up a lovely win for a Chapter 13 homeowner, but all I could see was the train wreck that lies ahead. The bankruptcy court ruled that the confirmed (and completed) plan trumped a late-filed mortgage proof of claim. Payment of the amount provided in the plan cured the prepetition...
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