The Kill Switch and The Stay

Kara K. Gendron, Esquire, Mott & Gendron Law (Harrisburg, PA)

A “kill switch” is a device which can be used to disable a machine or program. They have been used for years in a myriad of safety measures, such as shutting down machinery in the event of an emergency, or to prevent the theft of a machine or data. Some car lenders and dealerships, particularly those in the subprime lending industry, are using these kill switches increasingly as a means to aid in the collection of financed automobile payments. The so-called “kill switches,” also known in the car . . .

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