IRS Issues Guidance on Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Changes on Business Expense Deductions for Meals, Entertainment

On 10/3/18 the IRS issued guidance on business expense deductions for meals and entertainment following law changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) which eliminated the deduction for any expenses related to activities generally considered entertainment, amusement or recreation.

Taxpayers may continue to deduct 50% of the cost of business meals if the taxpayer (or an employee of the taxpayer) is present and the food or beverages are not considered lavish or extravagant. The meals may be provided to a current or potential business customer, client, consultant or similar business contact.

Food and beverages that are . . .

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